Approximately 1 To 4 Weeks

Nov 27, 2010 2 Comments by

Your Baby This Month

Week 1. The countdown to baby begins this week. Only thing is, There’s no baby in sight or inside. So, why call this week 1 of pregnancy?

Here’s why. It’s extremely hard to pinpoint the precise moment when sperm meet egg (sperm from your partner can hang out in your body for several days before your eggs comes out to greet it, and your egg can be kept waiting for a day for the sperm to make their appearance).

What isn’t hard to pinpoint, however is the first day of your last menstrual period, allowing the practitioner to use that as standard starting line for your 40-week pregnancy. The upshot of this dating system (besides a lot of potential for confusion)? You get to clock in two weeks of your 40 weeks pregnancy before you even get pregnant?

Week 2. Nope, still no baby yet. But your body isn’t taking a break this week. In fact, it’s working hard gearing up for the big O – ovulation.

The lining of your uterus is thickening and your ovarian follicles are maturing – some faster than others – until one becomes the dominant one, destined for ovulation. And waiting in that dominant follicle is an anxious egg (or two, if you’re about to conceive fraternal twins) with your baby’s name on it – ready to burst out and begin its journey from single cell to bouncing boy or girl.

But first it will have to make a journey down your fallopian tube in search of Mr. Right – the lucky sperm that will seal the deal.

Week 3. Congratulations – you’ve conceived! Which means your soon-to-be baby has started its miraculous transformation from single cell to fully formed baby boy or girl for cuddles and kisses. Within hours after sperm meets egg, the fertilized cell divides, and then continues to divide (and divide).

Within days, your baby-to-be has turned into a microscopic ball of cells, around one fifth the size of the period at the end of this sentence. The blastocyst – as it is now known – begins its journey from your fallopian tube to your waiting uterus. Only eight and a half months – give or take – to go!

Week 4. It’s implantation time! That ball of sells that you’ll soon call baby – though it’s now called embryo – has reached your uterus  and is snuggling into the uterine lining where it’ll stay connected to you until delivery.

Once firmly in place, the ball of cells undergoes the great divide – splitting into two groups. Half will become your son or daughter, while the other half will become the placenta, your baby’s lifeline during his or her uterine stay. And even though it’s just a ball of cells right now, don’t underestimate your little embryo – he or she has already come a long way since those blastocyst days.

The amniotic sac – otherwise known as the bag of waters – is forming, as is the yolk sac, which will later be incorporated into your baby’s developing digestive tract.

Each layer of the embryo – it has three now – is beginning to grow into specialized parts of the body. The inner layer, known as  the endoderm, will develop into your baby’s digestive system, liver, and lungs. The middle layer, called the mesoderm, will soon be your baby’s heart, sex organs, bones, kidneys, and muscles. The outer layer, or ectoderm, will eventually form your baby’s nervous system, hair, skin, and eyes.


From Conception To Delivery, Nine Months And Counting, The First Month

2 Responses to “Approximately 1 To 4 Weeks”

  1. mother to be2011 says:

    hello,
    i was once pregnant before and i had to have d&c surgery because the baby wasnt even in my uterus, it was in my fallopian tube, as a matter of fact i was told it wasnt even a baby. that was in august. now it is febuary and im 1 month pregnant im so scared this will happen again!!!!!!!!!! can someone give me advice that will make me feel better about my second pregnancy

  2. Influence your baby's gender says:

    Liking your site very much. Some really helpful info. Influencing you baby’s gender seems like a pretty simple and straightforward task – if you know some insider tricks. Thanks!

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